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Kansas State University

Featured Workshops

Thursday, February 9, 2012
Salon 1
8:30 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. The Academic Portfolio: A Successful New Way to Document Teaching, Research, and Service

An important change is taking place in higher education. Faculty are being held accountable – as never before – for how well they do their jobs. The traditional approach to evaluating and developing their performance has been to focus on the "what," but not on the "why." Thoughtful reflection, significance, and context were not built into the system. But these failings limit the understanding of the full range of a professor's work in teaching, research/scholarship, and service. Evaluators and faculty developers might understand a professor's teaching philosophy and methodology if they did a teaching portfolio. But they wouldn't easily understand the nature of the professor's research, the significance of selected publications, the context of their work, or their most noteworthy accomplishments and goals.

And they likely wouldn't know how a professor's teaching, research, and service are integrated to form a cohesive whole or how they fit with the institutional or departmental mission.

The best way to get at the individuality and complexity of faculty work is the academic portfolio. It may prove to be the most innovative and promising faculty evaluation and development technique in years. What is it? The portfolio is a 16-18 page selective gathering of documents and materials highlighting a professor's performance and suggesting its scope and quality. It's based on deep reflection and provides context and significance. The portfolio template used is the result of extensive research by the presenter. More than 200 faculty members and department chairs from across disciplines and institutions provided specific suggestions and recommendations. The result is a comprehensive template that can easily be adapted to individual faculty and department needs.

The academic portfolio concept has gone well beyond the point of theoretical possibility. Today, it is being adopted or pilot-tested by an increasing number of institutions. Significantly, they are institutions of every size, shape, and mission. This highly interactive session will describe the what, why, and how to develop an academic portfolio. It will discuss the critical role played by department chairs as they assist individual faculty to develop their portfolios. It will provide proven advice for getting started, discuss red-flag dangers, and benchmarks for success.

  Presented by:
Dr. Peter Seldin, Distinguished Professor of Management Emeritus
Pace University

Peter Seldin is Distinguished Professor of Management Emeritus at Pace University, Pleasantville, New York. Formerly an academic dean, department chair, and professor of management, he is a specialist in the evaluation and development of faculty and administrative performance and has been a consultant on higher education issues to more than 350 colleges and universities throughout the United States and in 45 countries around the world.

Salon 2
8:30 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. Managing Your Management Molecule: Working with Your Dean, Faculty, Staff and Students

This interactive and reflective workshop will explore how you can manage your dean, empower your staff, develop your faculty team, and serve your students and stakeholders. It begins with you at the center of your molecule and explores how you manage your relationships – up, down and to your sides. Specifically,

  • How do you strategically lead others through a) building community; b) setting direction; and c) empowering others?
  • What effective strategies can you use to manage your dean?
  • What is your relationship with your faculty, other chairs, and students?
  • Who, when and how should faculty and staff be involved in department decision making?
  • How do you manage your personal molecule – confidants, networks, allies, and family?
  • What legacy do you want to leave as a department leader?
  Presented by:
Dr. Walter Gmelch, Dean of the School of Education and Professor
University of San Francisco

Walter H. Gmelch is the Dean of the School of Education at the University of San Francisco. He formerly served as Dean of the College of Education at Iowa State University and Interim Dean of the College of Education, Professor, and Chair of the Educational Leadership and Counseling Psychology department at Washington State University. Currently, Dr. Gmelch also serves as Director of the National Center for Academic Leadership. Gmelch earned a Ph.D. in the Educational Executive Program from the University of California (Santa Barbara), a Master's in Business Administration from the University of California (Berkeley), and a Bachelor's degree from Stanford University. As educator, management consultant, university administrator, and former business executive, Dr. Gmelch has conducted research and written extensively on the topics of leadership, team development, conflict, and stress and time management. He has published numerous articles, books, and scholarly papers in national and international journals. Dr. Gmelch has authored three books on team leadership and two on management and stress. He has additionally co-authored three books on the deanship. Today, Gmelch is one of the leading researchers in the study of academic leaders in higher education, serving as editor of two journals and on the editorial board of six other journals including The Department Chair, Innovative Higher Education, Academic Leadership, and the Center for Academic Leadership Newsletter. Dr. Gmelch has received numerous honors including a Kellogg National Fellowship, the University Council for Educational Administration Distinguished Professor Award, the Faculty Excellence Award for Research, and the Education Press Award of America. In addition, he served in the Danforth Leadership Program and has been an Australian Research Fellow.

Legacy North 1
8:30 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. Coping and Preventing Conflict and Violence: A Constructive Approach to Difficult Conversations

With little authority and much responsibility, the Department Chair is more often perceived as an "empowered colleague" than the boss, and many are on a "temporary shift." Yet it is the Chair who is likely to first encounter the big problems on the campus: violence, threats, sexual assault, harassment, hostile work environments, conflicts of interest, governance struggles, to name a few. Intervening in conflicts at the departmental level can significantly decrease problems that move to the senior administration or legal counsel offices. Learning how to initiate difficult conversations can prevent conflict from escalating, triangulating or faction-forming. In this workshop participants will assess their personal preferences in dealing with conflict, identify ways to initiate hard conversations, address problems of revenge and increase cooperation and collaboration within the department. This is a hands-on session with case analyses and small group discussions. Participants are encouraged to bring examples of current conflicts.

  Presented by:
Dr. Sandra Cheldelin, Professor & Doctoral Program Director at the School of Conflict Analysis and Resolution (S-CAR)
George Mason University

Sandra Cheldelin is the Vernon M. and Minnie I. Lynch Professor of Conflict Analysis and Resolution and Doctoral Program Director at the School for Conflict Analysis and Resolution (S-CAR) at George Mason University. Over her four decades in the academy she has held faculty and administrative appointments at several colleges and universities including Provost at the McGregor School of Antioch University (Yellow Springs, Ohio) and Academic Dean at the California School of Professional Psychology (Berkeley). She is an active scholar-practitioner, psychologist, and expert in organizational conflict. She has worked with more than 150 organizations, and is often keynote speaker and invited lecturer on workplace issues of violence, change, race, gender and conflict. She has facilitated large-scale interethnic and interfaith community dialogues on topics of fear, terrorism, violence and suspicion, and has convened large and small groups to build community resilience. She has conducted conflict resolution trainings, interventions and research projects in Bosnia, Tajikistan, Ukraine, Georgia, the Middle East, Italy, Turkey, Liberia and China. She has written extensively on intervention and practice and is coeditor of Women Waging War and Peace: International Perspectives on Women's Roles in Conflict and Post-Conflict Reconstruction (Continuum, 2011) and of Conflict (Continuum, 2nd edition, 2008), and is coauthor of Conflict Resolution: an Academic Administrator's Guide, (Jossey Bass, 2004). She has served on a variety of conflict resolution related boards.

Salon 3
8:30 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. Assessing Learning at the Program Level: Writing the Plan, Working the Plan

Professional and Regional accreditors are putting increasing pressure on colleges and universities to demonstrate that their graduates have achieved identified learning outcomes. The Department Chair is often on the front line of documenting that all majors in their department have not only identified learning outcomes, but are also systematically assessing their students' achievement. This half day workshop will provide an overview of assessment planning at the program major level, along with specific tips and tools for implementing that plan.

  Presented by:
Dr. Susan Hatfield, Professor, Communication Studies
Winona State University

Susan Hatfield is a Professor of Communication Studies at Winona State University. She served nine years as chairperson in that department and for 12 years as the Assessment Coordinator. She is a Visiting Scholar with the Higher Learning Commission and serves as a peer evaluator for that organization.

Friday, February 10, 2012
Salon 3
12:30 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. Effective Perspective: A Helpful Stress Skill for Department Chairs

Academic department chairs often are among the most likely candidates for stress in their departments in part because they are perpetually in the middle, with demands directed at them both from their department colleagues and from higher administration, regardless of whether sufficient time or resources exist to meet the demands. This hands-on workshop will help participants explore personal stress management skills, including their own ability to conceptualize / label / perceive their situation in ways that will help them to cope more effectively with the inevitable heavy demands of their role as department chair.

  Presented by:
Dr. Tim Hatfield, Professor Emeritus
Winona State University

Tim Hatfield, Ph.D., is Professor and Chair Emeritus of Counselor Education at Winona State University, Winona, MN. Retired in July 2010 after 30 years (22 as department chair), he returned for an 8 month stint as assistant to the Dean of the College of Education to help with the launch of a major initiative to reform teacher education. He received both his A.B. (1967) and Ed. M. (1969) degrees from Harvard, after which he served as a school counselor at the University of Chicago Laboratory School and the Northfield Mount Hermon School, Mt. Hermon, MA, until 1976. His Ph.D. in Educational Psychology from the University of Minnesota was awarded in 1980, after which he assumed his position in the graduate faculty at Winona State. His specialty areas include stress management, lifespan development, and school counseling. The author of one book and over 30 articles and book chapters, he also is a frequent presenter regionally and nationally on stress management, burnout prevention, and staff renewal issues. His 1999 completion of a major stress management website www.winona.edu/stress reflects the integration of many of the major concepts that he has introduced to his students, colleagues, and workshop participants over the years. He is married to Susan Rickey Hatfield, Ph.D., also at Winona State and presenting at this conference, and they have four children from ages 18 to 31.

Salon 1
12:30 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. Legal Issues for Deans and Department Chairs

This interactive workshop is designed for deans and department chairs who want a better understanding of the legal issues involved in higher education administration. Through a series of hypothetical cases, participants will learn what laws are most relevant to their positions, how the courts have ruled in certain situations, and how the deans and chairs can be prepared to deal with the legal issues that develop during their administrative tenure. The discussion and handouts will cover such issues as faculty recruitment and hiring, evaluation, promotion and tenure, academic freedom, and dispute resolution. Other topics will include student/faculty relations, grading policies, academic dishonesty, sexual harassment, discrimination, and student privacy rights. Participants will also gain an understanding of the litigation process and how they may be involved as a defendant and/or a witness.

  Presented by:
Dr. Jon Dalager, Dean of the School of Natural and Social Sciences
Wayne State College

Jon Dalager has been an attorney since 1982, a department chair from 1999 to 2010, and a dean overseeing five academic departments since 2010. He has researched legal issues involving higher education and has given presentations on this subject at the Academic Chairpersons Conference, as well as other venues, in recent years. His ACC presentations were as follows: 2007 – The Faculty Handbook: A Guideline or a Labyrinth?, 2008 – Legal Issues in Faculty Recruitment and Hiring, 2010 – Legal Issues in Faculty Evaluation: Promotion, Tenure, or Termination? In 2010 and 2011, he presented research on individual and institutional academic freedom at the AAUP's Conference on the State of Higher Education and the Annual Meeting of the Midwest Political Science Association. His legal training, his research in higher education law, and his experiences as a department chair and dean have given him an insight and understanding of relevant legal issues that he would like to share.

Salon 2
12:30 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. Managing Your Management Molecule: Working with Your Dean, Faculty, Staff and Students
  Presented by:
Dr. Walter Gmelch, Dean of the School of Education and Professor
University of San Francisco

Dr. Walter Gmelch will be also be presenting on this same topic on Thursday February 9th, 2011. Please see above for Presentation Abstract and Biography.
Legacy North 1
12:30 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. Coping and Preventing Conflict and Violence: A Constructive Approach to Difficult Conversations
  Presented by:
Dr. Sandra Cheldelin, Professor & Doctoral Program Director at the School of Conflict Analysis and Resolution (S-CAR)
George Mason University

Dr. Sandra Cheldelin will be also be presenting on this same topic on Thursday February 9th, 2011. Please see above for Presentation Abstract and Biography.